News Feed: Amazon

Stories

Cinema on the River: A Floating Film Festival in the Heart of the Peruvian Amazon

The Muyuna Floating Film Festival showcased a unique floating screen, bringing films directly to riverside communities in the Peruvian Amazon. During the festival, Rainforest Foundation US supported an Indigenous Cinema Workshop, emphasizing the urgent need to understand these issues from the perspective of Indigenous peoples and local communities.

Stories

The Future is Female, and Indigenous

The III Indigenous Women’s March, held from September 11-14 in the Brazilian capital, Brasilia, brought together over 6,000 female leaders from various Indigenous communities worldwide. A delegation of women from Roraima highlighted how far women in Brazil were willing to travel to have their voices heard in the rallying cry in defense of their lands and cultures. Read our full account of the events.

News Releases

Brazil’s Supreme Court Votes in Favor of Indigenous Rights in Landmark Trial

Brazil’s Supreme Court reached a majority decision to reject Marco Temporal, a pernicious legal argument that translates as a “Time Limit” on Indigenous peoples’ land rights. As the results were announced, Indigenous communities around Brazil erupted into celebration, filling the central plazas of state capitals with music and dancing.

News Releases

Amazon Summit Falls Short: Leaders Must Dig Deeper and Assume Deforestation Commitments

The final declaration of the Amazon Summit, referred to as the Belém Declaration, has fallen short of expectations for collectively implementing crucial measures to protect the Amazon rainforest, its peoples, and the global climate. It notably lacks a commitment towards zero deforestation by 2030 and fails to address halting oil exploration in the region. Read our full statement.

Stories

Innovative Strategy Yields 17 Land Titles for Indigenous Communities in Peru 

Land titles are the most effective way to reduce deforestation rates in Indigenous peoples’ territory, resulting in a 66% reduction in forest cover loss. 17 land titles were secured for Indigenous communities in the Peruvian Amazon in record time—more titles were established in ten months than were possible in the previous three years.

Impacts of mining in the Yanomami people's territory.
Stories

Attack in Yanomami Community Kills Child and Injures Five More in Brazil

Five Yanomami Indigenous people, including two children, were injured in a shooting in Yanomami territory, in Roraima, Brazil, on Monday, July 3rd. It is not new that illegal mining has ravaged Indigenous lands, with more than 20,000 invaders in the Yanomami territory alone, destroying forests, bringing disease, sexual exploitation, and death.

Stories

Constitutional Trial Threatens Indigenous Peoples’ Land Rights in Brazil

The Marco Temporal thesis is the greatest threat to the rights and lives of Indigenous peoples in Brazil today. But the potential impacts are not limited to these communities—they are universal. Our shared future depends on the health of the Amazon, the world’s largest tropical forest and one of the major contributors to the climate’s maintenance. As the primary and best guardians of the Amazon rainforest, Indigenous peoples and their lands play a crucial role in mitigating climate change.

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2022 A Year In Review

As the year comes to a close we’re looking back at all of the amazing things we’ve accomplished in 2022, together! Check out our Year in Review.

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Didier Devers
Chief of Party – USAID Guatemala
gro.y1721245121nffr@1721245121sreve1721245121dd1721245121

Didier has been coordinating the USAID-funded B’atz project since joining Rainforest Foundation US in April 2022. He holds a Master’s in Applied Anthropology and a Bachelor’s in Geography. Before joining the organization, Didier worked for 12 years in Central and South America on issues of transparency, legality, governance, and managing stakeholders’ processes in the environmental sector. Prior to that he worked on similar issues in Central Africa. He speaks French, Spanish, and English, and is based in Guatemala.